Login | Registration
Keeping Kids Safe in a Wired World
 


The Future of Internet Safety Technology
is finally here!
 

 

Cyber-Safety.com in partnership with Family Watchdog needs the help of Canadians to have the Canadian Sex Offender Registry open to the public. As it stands only police in Canada have access to this vital information to help keep our children and communities protected from Sex Offenders.

www.familywatchdog.us has been instrumental in helping protect families from Sex Offenders BEFORE and offence happens in the United States . Cyber-Safety.com wants to gather names on a petition so they can approach the Federal Government to have the registry open to the public so the community can see who is living in their neighbourhoods. Below is information about the Sex Offender Registry in Canada . It is taken from and produced by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police located at www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/fs-fd/nsor-rnds-eng.htm .

Please submit your information on the petition to help keep our children and families protected by Clicking Here.

Thank You,

Rob Nickel
The Cyber Safety Expert

Sign Our Petition 

Background

In partnership with the provinces and territories, the Government of Canada created a National Sex Offender Registry to provide rapid access by police to current vital information about convicted sex offenders.

The Sex Offender Information Registration Act [SOIRA]) was proclaimed as law and came into force on December 15, 2004.

Ensuring Public Safety

Accredited police agencies in every province and territory can access the database. This new tool enhances public safety by assisting in the investigation of crimes of a sexual nature and identifying possible suspects known to reside near to the offence site. An officer is able to search for registered sex offenders living in the area.

The RCMP is responsible for the administration and maintenance of the database. Police in the various jurisdictions across Canada are responsible for inputting the data and enforcing the registration provisions.

Key Facts

The backbone of the National Sex Offender Registry is a national sex offender database, which is maintained by the RCMP.

Persons convicted of a designated sex offence as defined by the Sex Offender Information Registration Act (SOIRA) may be ordered by the court to register within 15 days of conviction and/or release from prison.

A person convicted of a designated sex offence who is under court order is required to report to the appropriate registration centre to re-register annually and every time they change address or legal name.

Persons under order after having been convicted of a sex offence are required to remain registered for 10 years, 20 years or life depending on the maximum length of the sentence for the crime.

The public does not have access to the National Sex Offender Registry. It is a database that provides Canadian police services with important information that will improve their ability to investigate crimes of a sexual nature.

The following Criminal Code offences have been included as designated offences under the SOIRA :

-

sexual interference;

-

invitation to sexual touching;

-

sexual exploitation;

-

incest;

-

bestiality;

-

child pornography (making, possession, distribution);

-

parent or guardian procuring sexual activity;

-

exposure;

-

sexual assault;

-

sexual assault with a weapon, threats to a third party or causing bodily harm; and

-

aggravated sexual assault;

-

as well as select offences where it can be proven that the offence was committed with the intent to commit an offence of a sexual nature; and

-

an attempt or conspiracy to commit the above offences.

Information such as addresses and telephone numbers, offence, alias(es), identifying marks and tattoos of convicted sex offenders are included in the national database.

Persons convicted of a sex offence are required to re-register annually and every time they change address or legal name.

There are penalties for failing to comply with a registration order or for not giving truthful information.

-

First Offence: a fine of not more than $10,000, imprisonment of not more than six months, or both.

-

Subsequent Offence(s): a fine of not more than $10,000, imprisonment for a term of not more than six months (summary conviction) or two years less a day (indictable), or both.

This information is from the RCMP site located at
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/techops/nsor/index_e.htm

Background

Proclamation of Bill C-16 and implementation of the National Sex Offender Registry

Bill C-16 ( Sex Offender Information Registration Act ) received Royal Assent on April 1, 2004, and came into force December 15, 2004, thereby mandating offenders who receive a court order to register with the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR). The national sex offender registration system will enable police to have rapid access to current vital information related to convicted sex offenders.

Originally introduced as Bill C-23, the Sex Offender Information Registration Act ( SOIRA) was tabled in the House of Commons on December 11, 2002. It was debated at second reading on February 21, 2003, however, Parliament prorogued later that year in November and as a result, Bill C-23 was not passed. In early 2004, SOIRA was nominated for reinstatement.

Parliament opened on February 2, 2004, and Bill C-16 (formally Bill C-23) was re-introduced to the Senate on February 12, 2004. The Sex Offender Information Registration Act received Royal Assent on April 1, 2004.

In the months following Royal Assent, all levels of government have been working together with he law enforcement community to implement as quickly, efficiently and effectively as possible.

National Sex Offender Registry Database

The cornerstone of Bill C-16 is the National Sex Offender Registry database. As part of the National Sex Offender Registry, the database will be housed and maintained by the National Police Services Network (NPSN) under the stewardship of the RCMP.

While consideration was given to upgrading CPIC to act as the National Sex Offender Registry, it was determined that CPIC, a database whose purpose is to maintain tombstone data of criminal convictions, would not have the functionality required of a Sex Offender Registry. As a result, a decision was made to develop the National Sex Offender Registry as a web-based external interface server that will be housed on the National Police Services Network (NPSN).

Accredited police agencies in every province and territory will be able to access the database ether directly or indirectly through their Provincial/Territorial Sex Offender Registration Centre. Police in the various jurisdictions will be responsible for inputting the data and the enforcement of the registration provisions. Access to personal information in the database will be tightly controlled and used for police investigation purposes and as authorized by law.

Registration Centres and Sites

The Provincial/Territorial Registration Centre will be responsible for the administrative aspects of the database (e.g. data entry). In addition to the central provincial or territorial centre, several registration sites will be spread throughout the province or territory. Sex offenders will be required to report to these sites to register annually where their data will be collected.

It is up to local jurisdictions to collect the data that will be entered on the NSOR database. Collection will be done by local police who will also be responsible for enforcement of the registration provisions.

Employees including both police officers and civilian staff from various Canadian police agencies will staff the registration centres.

Ensuring Public Safety

Together the Sex Offender Information Registration Act ( SOIRA ) and resulting registration system represent a vital step in fighting crimes of a sexual nature, protecting vulnerable children and adults, and safeguarding our communities.

The RCMP supports any tool which enhances our ability to provide Canadians with safe homes and safe communities. This new tool will enhance public safety by assisting the police in the investigation of crimes of a sexual nature and identifying possible suspects known to reside near to an offence site.

An officer will be able to instantly obtain a list of sex offenders who are registered and living in the area, if there are reasonable grounds to suspect that an offence of a sexual nature has occurred.

Police personnel will be able to conduct a sophisticated search according to an address or part address and the offence of a sex offender, or both. Offence information and registration information will be included, as well as other pertinent identification information such as photos, tattoos and other distinguishing marks.

This information is from the RCMP site found at
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/techops/nsor/nsor_backgrounder_e.htm

 

 

Copyright © 2004 Nickel Concepts. All Rights Reserved.